Introduction & Mission

Maine HIV Prevention Plan

Spring 2000 Update

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HIV Community Planning Group
Medical Care Development, Inc.
11 Parkwood Drive
Augusta, Maine 04330
Tel: (207) 622-7566, ext. 233
TTY: (207) 622-1209
Fax: (207) 622-3616
Email:

ME HIV CPG  - Community Plan

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Appendix 4 - Training Materials: Prioritizing Interventions

What priority interventions do we want being done to meet the needs of each priority population?

Develop and apply a process to prioritize interventions that uses behavioral science research and other data sources.

1.     What interventions could be directed at meeting the needs of each priority population?

Create a list of possible interventions for each identified need based on what the research and your own experience tells us works.

2.     What interventions are currently being done to meet the needs of each priority population?

List the types of interventions currently being conducted for each priority population.

3.     What is the difference between what is currently being done and the priority interventions we want to be done?

Conduct a “gap analysis” by comparing what priority interventions you are doing to what interventions you want to be doing.

4.     How can statewide HIV prevention shift towards the priority interventions we want being done?

Develop recommendations to enhance statewide HIV prevention:

  •  Initiate priority interventions that are not being done

  • Continue priority interventions that are currently being done

  • Redirect nonpriority interventions that are currently being done

 

 CATEGORIES OF BEHAVIOR FACTORS

What do I think about my risk for HIV? - RISK APPRAISAL

1.     Perceived risk – Who do I think is at risk for HIV?

2.     Perceived susceptibility – How vulnerable am I to HIV?

3.     Expected outcomes – Is it worth it for me to change my behavior?

4.     Perceived severity – Is HIV a serious threat to my health?

5.     Knowledge – How much do I know about HIV?

How do I feel about myself? - SELF-PERCEPTION

1.     Self-efficacy – How confident do I feel about being able to change my behavior?

2.     Intentions – What is my plan to change my behavior?

3.     Ambivalence – Do I feel like I can’t decide – sometimes I want to change and sometimes I don’t?

4.     Self-standards/self-identity – How do I see myself in relation to the behavior I’m thinking about changing?

5.     Skills – Am I able to actually perform the behavior?

What strong feelings do I have in relation to the behavior? - EMOTION AND AROUSAL

1.     Moods – How do I feel in general?

2.     Sexual arousal – What turns me on?

3.     Shame and guilt - How do I handle shame and guilt in relation to risky behaviors?

How do other people affect me? - RELATIONSHIP ISSUES AND SOCIAL INFLUENCE

          Sexual Relationship Dynamics:

1.     Communication and negotiation – How do I talk about sex or drug use with my partner?

2.     Cultural/family norms and values about sexuality and gender roles – What are my family and racial/ethnic group rules and values about sex?  About the roles of men and women?

3.     Cultural/family norms and values about sexual communication –What are the standards for talking about sex among the people in my family and racial/ethnic group?

4.     Interpersonal power dynamics – How much am I in control of what happens between my sex or drug-using partner and me?

5.     Relationship development – How long have I been with my partner and how would I describe my relationship?

Social Issues:

1.     Social norms – What are the standards of behavior among my friends? My cultural group?

2.     Peer pressure – How much does what my friends say and do determine what I do?

3.     Social support and social group network – How do others encourage or undermine what I do about my behavior?

What other things outside of me affect what I feel, think and do about the behavior? - STRUCTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS

1.     Environmental barriers or facilitators – What things in my neighborhood or community make it harder for me to change or help me to change?

2.     Social norms, laws, regulations – Are there laws or ways of doing things by my friends or people in my community that make it harder for me to change or help me to change?

3.     Family, cultural or religious norms - Are there ways of doing things by my family that make it harder for me to change or help me to change?

4.     Access to services – How hard or easy is it for me to get services I need?

  Interventions that relate 
 to categories of behavior
 

RISK APPRAISAL

1.     In formation giving

2.     Story-telling

3.     “High risk behaviors” versus “”risky groups”

4.     Other ways to personalize risk  

SELF-PERCEPTION

1.     Skill-building

2.     Coaching

3.     Realistic planning

4.     Anticipating personal high-risk situations

5.     Encouraging success in other areas of one’s life

6.     Weighing pros and cons

7.     Referrals for treatment of underlying problems

EMOTION AND AROUSAL

1.     Eroticizing safer sex

2.     Sex-positive messages

3.     Learning to recognize and avoid triggers

4.     Offer substitutes to meet emotional and arousal needs

5.     Providing information in relevant settings and in pleasurable ways

6.     Stress-reduction activities

RELATIONSHIP ISSUES AND SOCIAL INFLUENCE

1.     Communication skills building

2.     Eroticizing safer sex

3.     Using role models to change group norms

4.     Peer outreach

5.     Peer pressure resistance skills building

6.     Encouraging change to protect family members or other loved ones

7.     Workplace or other organization-based interventions

8.     Support groups

9.     Social groups and other opportunities for social affiliation

10. Social marketing

STRUCTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS

1.     Working on policy changes that affect service delivery

2.     Working on legislation at local, state, or federal level

3.     Local activism

4.     Community mobilization to enhance participation

5.     Empowerment/popular education

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Introduction & Mission | Maine HIV Prevention Plan
Spring 2000 Update
| Links to Prevention
Maine Links
| Contact Us